Results tagged ‘ David Ortiz ’

Today in unsurprising news…

manny_250.jpgThe Yankees and White Sox are under way after a 64-minute rain delay. A rain delay. Go figure.

In other news that cannot possibly qualify as surprising, two more stars in the game have been exposed, having shown up positive for performance-enhancing drugs on the 2003 list, the one with 104 names. The one that was supposed to be confidential. Manny and Big Papi join A-Rod. Nearly six months later.

The leaky faucet that is baseball’s steroids past continues to drip.

The most telling part of today was the reaction – weary, subdued reaction – from Derek Jeter, Johnny Damon and Mark Teixeira in the clubhouse. Damon said the news surprised him – really, how could it have? – but couldn’t have said anything else about his former teammates. Damon later joked that perhaps he will turn out to be the biggest idiot of them all for never noticing, never suspecting.

Damon and Teixeira – and on the other side of the field, Ozzie Guillen – said the list of the 104 should be made public in a once-and-for-all attempt to deal with and then move past the hovering dark cloud. That the guilty were once promised confidentiality no longer seems to sway the weary. They’ve had it.

Those who compromised the confidentiality – and, make no mistake, they are a different brand of guilty — ultimately may win.

“I guess,” Damon said, shrugging, “you really can’t trust what anybody says nowadays.”

And maybe you simply can’t trust an entire era even though a bewildered Jeter again felt compelled to offer this reminder: “Everybody wasn’t doing it.” Upon today’s news, try to convince anyone that steroid use wasn’t pervasive in the 2003 Red Sox clubhouse.

“That’s probably what is being said,” Damon said, “and that’s what makes guys like me upset.”

Teixeira suggested that kids look to himself, Matt Holliday and Chase Utley as players who’ve put up numbers since 2003 and “have done it the right way.”

Or how about young players like Evan Longoria, Adam Jones, Phil Hughes, Joba Chamberlain and the Upton brothers, who weren’t even in the game back then?

Or how about the ones – perhaps not as numerous as we’d hope – who came out of the steroid era clean, who are able to look themselves squarely in the mirror?

After talking to the media, Jeter went to the batting cage to stow his bat in the Yankees dugout. As he did, a few kids wanted autographs, which he signed. An older gentleman at the edge of the dugout simply asked to shake his hand. “I admire,” he told Jeter, “the way you’ve always played the game.”

Jeter shook his hand. And said thanks.

Birthday wishes and Boston fans

Who’s the AccuWeather guy on our pregame? Haven’t seen him. Maybe we should ask him why they always get forecasts wrong. Or why it feels like March in October.

Or maybe we should just leave the poor guy alone and worry about blogging.

(By the way, this is last night’s post being posted this morning. Not sure what happened with the exchange last night. Catch you later today.)
 
No Beantown blues: One of you asked how the media is treated in Boston. Like dogs! Just kidding. The reporters mostly get along. (Some of the NY writers don’t exactly love each other, but that has nothing to do with Boston.) The players seem to get along. (Everyone in baseball talks to Big Papi during batting practice and the Yankees players are no exception.) The fans sometimes yell vile/nasty things, but that’s life. Boston is no different than any other place. Generally speaking, fans — and especially some callers to sports talk radio — have more venom than players or members of the media do.
 
On the menu: So everyone wishes Kenny a very Happy Birthday! Kenny had a nice lunch with his wife, whose blog “Mrs. Singy: Married to Baseball” is also available for your perusal on this site.

Besides Kenny’s chocolate cake, which is being cut as we write, dinner in the press dining room dinner included grilled chicken, peas and mac and cheese. Pretty healthy, particularly the chicken. So Kay went with ice cream for dinner. Flaherty had chicken and pizza; we had chicken, peas and mac and cheese. (We ate separately; no one likes to wait until after my pregame pop to eat with me. Well, actually, O’Neill does sometimes.) The Boston press dining is making a comeback this series. Much better than when we were here in April, when it was uncharacteristically slumping.
 
Speaking of slumps: The Boston fans are giving a clinic in how to treat a struggling superstar. They cheered Ortiz for flying out to deep center. The ball went to the deepest part of the park, but Ortiz walked off the field with his head hung.

And with the fans — some of whom were standing — cheering him.
 
Can Wang get right? The Red Sox scouting report on Wang indicated that he isn’t the old Wang, neither in command nor in velocity. Turns out, it was right as, for the second night in a row, the Yankees starter went two and 2/3. Not exactly what Girardi was hoping for.

Bromance brewing in Boston?

What a day. Good game so far. And it was Taco Night in the Fenway Park Media Dining Room.

Ay caramba!

jeter_pedroia_250.jpgBatting practice was fun on the field. The players really seem to get along well; Pedroia, Youkilis and Ortiz were among those yucking it up with some Yankees. I can’t vouch for whether the Jeter-Pedroia-Youk bromance embers still burn from the WBC, but Pedroia did say Jeter is the one player who isn’t a Red Sox that he’d like to play with. (Please note of the phrasing by Pedroia.)

A little preview for tomorrow: A.J. is pumped for his start against former Marlins teammate/good buddy Josh Beckett. A.J. has completely embraced being a Yankee and being a part of this rivalry. “It shows what you’re made of,” he said. “I love it.”

Posada will catch A.J. tomorrow, Girardi said this afternoon. A.J. and Molina have had a great thing going. (FOX will have the game. We’ll have postgame.)

Wang is headed to the DL unless the medical people somehow advise otherwise for a guy coming off a foot injury, whose velocity is down and mechanics are messed up. Not to mention his confidence, which is shot.

Chances are, it’ll be Phil Hughes making the Tuesday start in Detroit. We’ll have to get an update on his blog from him. Girardi said Hughes’ location has been great, and he’s been working on his changeup and cutter. The AAA Scranton/Wilkes Barre Yankees are 12-1, so a lot of guys are pitching well there.

So the boos for Teixeira weren’t so bad, huh? If Alex plays games in the first week of May – as Cashman said — it would seem his return might be a few days before the target of May 15, but not as early as some people in and around the Yanks were predicting.

Somehow Joba doesn’t look like Joba when he’s a starter. He’s walking a tightrope tonight, isn’t he? But those double plays are golden.